Reconstructing the English Codification Debate: The Criminal Law Commissioners, 1833–45

@article{Farmer2000ReconstructingTE,
  title={Reconstructing the English Codification Debate: The Criminal Law Commissioners, 1833–45},
  author={Lindsay Farmer},
  journal={Law and History Review},
  year={2000},
  volume={18},
  pages={397 - 426}
}
Sir Henry Maine, the eminent Victorian jurist, once remarked, in frustration at being unable to secure his desired reforms of the Indian criminal law, that no one cared about the penal code except theorists and habitual criminals. This has been the recurrent lament of the English criminal lawyer. Repeated initiatives in the field of codification over the last 150 years have enjoyed little popular support or understanding, and as the most recent project stumbles forward into its fourth decade… 
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