Reconstructing the Diet of an Extinct Hominin Taxon: The Role of Extant Primate Models

@article{Wood2012ReconstructingTD,
  title={Reconstructing the Diet of an Extinct Hominin Taxon: The Role of Extant Primate Models},
  author={B. Wood and K. Schroer},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2012},
  volume={33},
  pages={716-742}
}
Modern humans represent the only surviving species of an otherwise extinct clade of primates, the hominins. As the closest living relatives to extinct hominins, extant primates are an important source of comparative information for the reconstruction of the diets of extinct hominins. Methods such as comparative and functional morphology, finite element analysis, dental wear, dental topographic analysis, and stable isotope biogeochemistry must be validated and tested within extant populations… Expand

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