Reconstructing and Interpreting a Thirteenth-Century Office for the Translation of Thomas Becket

@article{Reames2005ReconstructingAI,
  title={Reconstructing and Interpreting a Thirteenth-Century Office for the Translation of Thomas Becket},
  author={S. Reames},
  journal={Speculum},
  year={2005},
  volume={80},
  pages={118 - 170}
}
  • S. Reames
  • Published 1 January 2005
  • History
  • Speculum
The translation of Thomas Becket's relics from the crypt of Canterbury Cathedral to the magnificent shrine at the east end of the cathedral proper, on July 7, 1220, was one of the great symbolic events in the life of the medieval English church. The dignitaries who took part in the ceremony included the young king, Henry III; the chief justiciar, Hubert de Burgh; the papal legate, Pandulf; the archbishops of Canterbury, Reims, and an unidentified see in Hungary; most of the diocesan bishops of… 
6 Citations
St Pientia and the Château de la Roche-Guyon: Relic Translations and Sacred History in Seventeenth-Century France
  • J. Hillman
  • Philosophy
    Studies in Church History
  • 2017
This article explores the connections between the translation of an early Christian relic to the Château de la Roche-Guyon in the mid-seventeenth century and the writing of local sacred histories by
The Conductus of W1: an investigation into their history and rhythm
The manuscript ‘W1’, otherwise known as the St Andrews Music Book, contains 197 folios of music from the 13th century. This music was transmitted to St Andrews from the cathedral of Notre-Dame,
York Minster's Chapter House and its painted glass narratives
This thesis focuses on the late thirteenth-century narrative glazing scheme of the chapter house in York Minster and the political and religious context of its design. Created as an intrinsic and
Mid-fifteenth-century English mass cycles in continental sources
Fifteenth-century English music had a profound impact on mainland Europe, with several important innovations (e.g. the cyclic cantus firmus Mass) credited as English in origin. However, the turbulent
Notre Dame in Scotland: W1 and Liturgical Reform at St Andrews
.......................................................................................................................... i ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Liturgical chant bibliography 17
Liturgical chant bibliography 17 maintains the previously established subdivisions: (1) Editions and facsimile editions, (2) Books and reprints, (3) Congress reports, (4) Chant journals, (5)