Recognizing filamentous basidiomycetes as agents of human disease: A review.

@article{Chowdhary2014RecognizingFB,
  title={Recognizing filamentous basidiomycetes as agents of human disease: A review.},
  author={Anuradha Chowdhary and Shallu Kathuria and Kshitij Agarwal and Jacques F. Meis},
  journal={Medical mycology},
  year={2014},
  volume={52 8},
  pages={
          782-97
        }
}
Filamentous basidiomycetes (BM) are common environmental fungi that have recently emerged as important human pathogens, inciting a wide array of clinical manifestations that include allergic and invasive diseases. We reviewed 218 reported global cases of BM fungi. The most common etiologic agent was Schizophyllum commune in 52.3% (114/218) of the cases followed by Hormographiella aspergillata (n = 13; 5.9%), Ceriporia lacerata (n = 11; 5%), and, rarely, Volvariella volvacea, Inonotus tropicalis… 

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