Recognition of heterospecific alarm vocalizations by bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata).

@article{Ramakrishnan2000RecognitionOH,
  title={Recognition of heterospecific alarm vocalizations by bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata).},
  author={Uma Ramakrishnan and Richard G. Coss},
  journal={Journal of comparative psychology},
  year={2000},
  volume={114 1},
  pages={
          3-12
        }
}
Recognition of heterospecific alarm vocalizations is an essential component of antipredator behavior in several prey species. The authors examined the role of learning in the discrimination of heterospecific vocalizations by wild bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata) in southern India The bonnet macaques' flight and scanning responses to playbacks of their own alarm vocalizations were compared with their responses to playbacks of vocalizations of Nilgiri langurs (Trachypithecus johnii), Hanuman… 

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