Reciprocity and trades in wild West African chimpanzees

@article{Gomes2011ReciprocityAT,
  title={Reciprocity and trades in wild West African chimpanzees},
  author={Cristina M. Gomes and Christophe Boesch},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2011},
  volume={65},
  pages={2183-2196}
}
Why do animals help other individuals and provide benefits to the recipient, sometimes at personal cost? In this study, we aim to determine if some of the helpful behaviors observed in a group of wild chimpanzees (Taï chimpanzee group, Côte d'Ivoire, West Africa) are exchanged among individuals resulting in a net benefit for both participants. We adopted an inclusive view of exchanges by considering that all commodities (i.e., social behaviors as grooming, sex, support, as well as resources… Expand

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