Reciprocal signaling in honeyguide-human mutualism

@article{Spottiswoode2016ReciprocalSI,
  title={Reciprocal signaling in honeyguide-human mutualism},
  author={C. Spottiswoode and K. Begg and C. Begg},
  journal={Science},
  year={2016},
  volume={353},
  pages={387 - 389}
}
Show me a sign of sweetness to come Communication between humans and domesticated animals is common. Regular communication between humans and wild animals, however, is rare. African honey-guide birds are known to regularly lead human honey-hunters to bee colonies, and the humans, on opening up the nest, leave enough mess for the birds to feast on. Spottiswoode et al. show that when the honey-hunters make a specific call, honey-guides are both more likely to come to their aid and more likely to… Expand
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