Reciprocal altruism and food sharing decisions among Hiwi and Ache hunter–gatherers

@article{Gurven2004ReciprocalAA,
  title={Reciprocal altruism and food sharing decisions among Hiwi and Ache hunter–gatherers},
  author={Michael D. Gurven},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={56},
  pages={366-380}
}
  • M. Gurven
  • Published 20 May 2004
  • Psychology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
The common occurrence of food transfers within human hunter–gatherer and forager–horticulturalist groups presents exciting test cases for evolutionary models of altruism. While kin biases in sharing are consistent with nepotism based on kin selection, there is much debate over the extent to which reciprocal altruism and tolerated scrounging provide useful explanations of observed behavior. This paper presents a model of optimal sharing breadth and depth, based on a general non-tit-for-tat form… 

To give and to give not: The behavioral ecology of human food transfers

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  • Psychology
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences
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Overall, this analysis suggests that exchanges among kin are primarily associated with differences in need, not reciprocity, and that studies of food sharing may benefit from distinctions between lineal and collateral kin.

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Trust and cooperation in natural resource management: the case of agistment in rangelands

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Testing adaptive hypotheses of alloparenting in Agta foragers

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