Reciprocal Natural Selection on Host‐Parasite Phenotypes

@article{Clayton1999ReciprocalNS,
  title={Reciprocal Natural Selection on Host‐Parasite Phenotypes},
  author={Dale H. Clayton and Patricia L. M. Lee and Daniel M. Tompkins and Edmund D. Brodie III},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1999},
  volume={154},
  pages={261 - 270}
}
Coevolution is evolution in one species in response to selection imposed by a second species, followed by evolution in the second species in response to reciprocal selection imposed by the first species. Although reciprocal selection is a prerequisite of coevolution, it has seldom been documented in natural populations. We examined the feasibility of reciprocal selection in a simple host‐parasite system consisting of feral pigeons (Columba livia) and their Ischnoceran feather lice (Phthiraptera… Expand
Host defense reinforces host–parasite cospeciation
TLDR
Host defense reinforces cospeciation in birds and feather lice by preventing lice from switching between hosts of different sizes, suggesting that adaptive constraints limit the range of hosts lice can use. Expand
The evolution of host specificity in dove body lice
TLDR
The correlation in body lice suggests that dispersal between host species may occur via the ground, and suggests that body lICE may fall to the ground more often than wing lice. Expand
An experimental test of host specialization in a ubiquitous polar ectoparasite: a role for adaptation?
TLDR
The results indicate that the genetic divergence previously observed among sympatric I. uriae host races is at least partially linked to adaptive specialisation to the host species and not simply to host-mediated transmission, and suggest that the adaptation process may evolve differently in different life stages based on trade-offs with physiological constraints. Expand
Rapid experimental evolution of reproductive isolation from a single natural population
TLDR
It is shown that experimental evolution of parasite body size over 4 y leads to reproductive isolation in natural populations of feather lice on birds, effectively demonstrating how natural selection can cause species to form. Expand
LINKING COEVOLUTIONARY HISTORY TO ECOLOGICAL PROCESS: DOVES AND LICE
TLDR
It is found that dove body lice show strong evidence of cospeciation whereas dove wing lice do not, and differences in their dispersal ability may underlie these joint differences in host specificity, population genetic structure, and coevolutionary history. Expand
Experimental evolution of reproductive isolation from a single natural population
TLDR
It is shown that experimental evolution of parasite body size over four years leads to reproductive isolation in natural populations of feather lice on birds, confirming that divergent natural selection acting on a single phenotypic trait can cause reproductive isolation to emerge from a single natural population in real time. Expand
Community interactions govern host-switching with implications for host–parasite coevolutionary history
TLDR
Differences in the coevolutionary history of wing and body lice can be explained by differences in host-switching, mediated by a member of the broader parasite community. Expand
COMPARATIVE TRANSMISSION DYNAMICS OF COMPETING PARASITE SPECIES.
TLDR
The dispersal prediction of the competition-colonization model was tested by documenting the transmission dynamics of feather-feeding lice, which are permanent, relatively host-specific parasites of birds, and it was confirmed that wing lice are much better than body lice at colonizing new hosts. Expand
Differential host defense against multiple parasites in ants
TLDR
It is concluded that the selection pressure on the host to evolve counter-defenses is higher for costly parasites and, thus, a hierarchical host defense strategy has evolved that depends on the parasites’ impact. Expand
Does behavioural flexibility facilitate host switching by parasites
TLDR
Behavioural flexibility may play a pivotal role in the ability of wing lice to establish on different sized novel host species, and could be an important factor for other parasites faced with novel hosts. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 57 REFERENCES
Host resources govern the specificity of swiftlet lice: size matters
TLDR
Comparing the relative fitness of host-specific lice experimentally transferred among closely related species of cave swiftlets in northern Borneo shows that adaptation to a particular resource on the body of the host does appear to govern the specificity of swiftlet lice. Expand
Experimental demonstration of the energetic cost of parasitism in free-ranging hosts
TLDR
The results demonstrate that even classically ‘benign’ parasites such as feather lice can reduce host condition through the accumulation of subtle energetic costs over time, and argues that experimental manipulations are a prerequisite for documenting such effects. Expand
AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CO-EVOLUTION BETWEEN THE CUCKOO, CUCULUS CANORUS, AND ITS HOSTS. I. HOST EGG DISCRIMINATION
TLDR
Three results suggest that the egg discrimination by suitable hosts has evolved in response to cuckoo parasitism, and Species unsuitable as hosts mainly showed little if any rejection of model eggs unlike their own. Expand
WHEN IS IT COEVOLUTION?
  • D. Janzen
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1980
'Coevolution' may be usefully defined as an evolutionary change in a trait of the individuals in one population in response to a trait of the individuals of a second population, followed by anExpand
AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CO-EVOLUTION BETWEEN THE CUCKOO, CUCULUS CANORUS, AND ITS HOSTS. II. HOST EGG MARKINGS, CHICK DISCRIMINATION AND GENERAL DISCUSSION
TLDR
The variation in rejection of unlike eggs among different species of suitable cuckoo hosts is not related to the current costs or benefits of rejecting cuckoos, and it is suggested that the variation represents snap shots in evolutionary time of different stages of a species. Expand
BUTTERFLIES AND PLANTS: A STUDY IN COEVOLUTION
TLDR
The relationship between butterflies and their food plants is investigated, the examination of patterns of interaction between two major groups of organisms with a close and evident ecological relationship, such as plants and herbivores. Expand
Ectoparasite virulence is linked to mode of transmission
  • D. Clayton, D. Tompkins
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1994
TLDR
Compared the virulence of lice and mites infesting a single group of captive rock doves, results support the hypothesis that ectoparasite virulence is linked to the mode of transmission. Expand
Gene-for-gene coevolution between plants and parasites
TLDR
The emerging pattern from these studies suggests that metapopulation structure may be at least as important as local natural selection in determining the genetic dynamics and outcomes of these evolutionary arms races. Expand
Mate Choice in Experimentally Parasitized Rock Doves: Lousy Males Lose
TLDR
A series of mate choice trials in which female Rock Doves were allowed to choose between “clean” males without lice and “lousy’ males with experimentally increased loads, finding that clean males displayed significantly more often than lousy males and females demonstrated a significant preference for clean males. Expand
ON THE MEASUREMENT OF NATURAL AND SEXUAL SELECTION: APPLICATIONS
  • S. J. Arnold, M. Wade
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1984
TLDR
This paper uses measures of selection developed by quantitative geneticists and some new results to analyze multiple episodes of selection in natural populations of amphibians, reptiles, and insects. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...