Receptive Fields for Vision : from Hyperacuity to ObjectRecognition

@inproceedings{EdelmanDept1997ReceptiveFF,
  title={Receptive Fields for Vision : from Hyperacuity to ObjectRecognition},
  author={Shimon EdelmanDept},
  year={1997}
}
  • Shimon EdelmanDept
  • Published 1997
Many of the lower-level areas in the mammalian visual system are organized retinotopically, that is, as maps which preserve to a certain degree the topography of the retina. A unit that is a part of such a retinotopic map normally responds selectively to stimulation in a well-delimited part of the visual eld, referred to as its receptive eld (RF). Receptive elds are probably the most prominent and ubiquitous computational mechanism employed by biological information processing systems. This… CONTINUE READING

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