Recent upper respiratory tract infection and pityriasis rosea: a case‐control study of 249 matched pairs

@article{Chuang1983RecentUR,
  title={Recent upper respiratory tract infection and pityriasis rosea: a case‐control study of 249 matched pairs},
  author={T Y Chuang and Harold O. Perry and Duane M. Ilstrup and Leonard T. Kurland},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={1983},
  volume={108}
}
A sample of 249 patients was drawn from an original population of 939 patients with pityriasis rosea identified in an earlier population‐based study of pityriasis rosea in Rochester, Minnesota. A control was selected for each case, matched for age, sex, and year of diagnosis. Comparison was made with regard to recent immunization, history of atopy, and recent infection. A statistically significant number of patients had experienced recent upper respiratory tract infection (P<0.005). The… 

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