Recent near-Earth supernovae probed by global deposition of interstellar radioactive 60Fe

@inproceedings{Wallner2016RecentNS,
  title={Recent near-Earth supernovae probed by global deposition of interstellar radioactive 60Fe},
  author={Anton Wallner and J. Feige and Norikazu Kinoshita and Marchal Paul and L. Keith Fifield and Robin Golser and Mitsugi Honda and Ulf Linnemann and Hiroyuki Matsuzaki and Silke Merchel and Georg Rugel and S G Tims and Peter Steier and Takanori Yamagata and S. R. Winkler},
  booktitle={Nature},
  year={2016}
}
The rate of supernovae in our local Galactic neighbourhood within a distance of about 100 parsecs from Earth is estimated to be one every 2–4 million years, based on the total rate in the Milky Way (2.0 ± 0.7 per century). Recent massive-star and supernova activity in Earth’s vicinity may be traced by radionuclides with half-lives of up to 100 million years, if trapped in interstellar dust grains that penetrate the Solar System. One such radionuclide is 60Fe (with a half-life of 2.6 million… CONTINUE READING