Recent habitat fragmentation due to roads can lead to significant genetic differentiation in an abundant flightless ground beetle

@article{Keller2004RecentHF,
  title={Recent habitat fragmentation due to roads can lead to significant genetic differentiation in an abundant flightless ground beetle},
  author={I Keller and Wolfgang Nentwig and Carlo R. Largiad{\`e}r},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={13}
}
Although habitat fragmentation is suspected to pose a major threat to biodiversity, its impact on abundant invertebrate species has been little investigated. We assessed the genetic population structure of the flightless ground beetle Abax parallelepipedus in a forest fragmented by two main roads and a highway using five microsatellite loci. We detected low levels of genetic differentiation, which was concordant with the high population densities of 632–1707 individuals/ha estimated with a mark… 
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