Recent common ancestry of human Y chromosomes: evidence from DNA sequence data.

@article{Thomson2000RecentCA,
  title={Recent common ancestry of human Y chromosomes: evidence from DNA sequence data.},
  author={Robert Thomson and Jonathan K. Pritchard and Peidong Shen and Peter J. Oefner and Marcus W. Feldman},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2000},
  volume={97 13},
  pages={
          7360-5
        }
}
We consider a data set of DNA sequence variation at three Y chromosome genes (SMCY, DBY, and DFFRY) in a worldwide sample of human Y chromosomes. Between 53 and 70 chromosomes were fully screened for sequence variation at each locus by using the method of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. The sum of the lengths of the three genes is 64,120 bp. We have used these data to study the ancestral genealogy of human Y chromosomes. In particular, we focused on estimating the expected… Expand
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