Recent advances in understanding the actions and toxicity of nitrous oxide

@article{Maze2000RecentAI,
  title={Recent advances in understanding the actions and toxicity of nitrous oxide},
  author={M. Maze and M. Fujinaga},
  journal={Anaesthesia},
  year={2000},
  volume={55}
}
For the more than 150 years that clinicians have been using nitrous oxide (N2O), researchers continue to struggle over the mechanisms for both its anaesthetic/analgesic action as well as its toxicity. Eger's exhaustive tome, `Nitrous oxide/N2O', published in 1985 [1], provided an excellent summary of clinical and research issues as they stood at that time. Since then, investigators continue to penetrate the mysteries of this unique anaesthetic gas. Rather than recite the well-known… Expand
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