Recent Immigrants: Unexpected Implications for Crime and Incarceration

@article{Butcher1997RecentIU,
  title={Recent Immigrants: Unexpected Implications for Crime and Incarceration},
  author={Kristin F. Butcher and A. Piehl},
  journal={Industrial & Labor Relations Review},
  year={1997},
  volume={51},
  pages={654 - 679}
}
  • Kristin F. Butcher, A. Piehl
  • Published 1997
  • Political Science, Economics
  • Industrial & Labor Relations Review
  • This analysis of data from the 5% 1980 and 1990 Public Use Microdata Samples shows that among 18–40-year-old men in the United States, immigrants were less likely than the native-born to be institutionalized (that is, in correctional facilities, mental hospitals, or other institutions), and much less likely to be institutionalized than native-born men with similar demographic characteristics. Furthermore, earlier immigrants were more likely to be institutionalized than were more recent… CONTINUE READING
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