Rebellion in Africa: Disaggregating the Effect of Political Regimes

@article{Carey2007RebellionIA,
  title={Rebellion in Africa: Disaggregating the Effect of Political Regimes},
  author={Sabine C. Carey},
  journal={Journal of Peace Research},
  year={2007},
  volume={44},
  pages={47 - 64}
}
  • Sabine C. Carey
  • Published 1 January 2007
  • Political Science
  • Journal of Peace Research
This article analyzes how the selection process for the executive affects the risk of rebellion and insurgencies in sub-Saharan Africa between 1971 and 1995. Four executive recruitment processes are distinguished that are characteristic for the African context: (1) a process without elections; (2) single-candidate elections; (3) single-party, multiple-candidate elections; and (4) multiparty executive elections. The results suggest that single-candidate elections and multiparty elections… 

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