Rebel with a cause? Iconography and public memory in the Southern United States

@article{Leib2000RebelWA,
  title={Rebel with a cause? Iconography and public memory in the Southern United States},
  author={Jonathan I. Leib and Gerald R. Webster and Roberta H. Webster},
  journal={GeoJournal},
  year={2000},
  volume={52},
  pages={303-310}
}
Recent years have witnessed debates in the American South between traditional white Southerners and African American Southerners over whether and how symbols from the region's two defining historical events – the Civil War and the Civil Rights movement – are displayed on the region's landscape. This paper examines the most contentious of these debates, the conflict over government sanction for flying the various flags of the Confederate States of America. This article first discusses the… Expand
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