Reassessment of the phylogenetic interrelationships of basal turtles (Testudinata)

@article{Anquetin2012ReassessmentOT,
  title={Reassessment of the phylogenetic interrelationships of basal turtles (Testudinata)},
  author={J{\'e}r{\'e}my Anquetin},
  journal={Journal of Systematic Palaeontology},
  year={2012},
  volume={10},
  pages={3 - 45}
}
  • J. Anquetin
  • Published 27 February 2012
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Journal of Systematic Palaeontology
Recent discoveries from the Late Triassic and Middle Jurassic have significantly improved the fossil record of early turtles. These new forms offer a unique opportunity to test the interrelationships of basal turtles. Nineteen fossil species are added to the taxon sample of the most comprehensive morphological phylogenetic analysis of the turtle clade. Among these additional species are recently discovered forms (e.g. Odontochelys semitestacea, Eileanchelys waldmani, Condorchelys antiqua), taxa… 
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