Reassessing the costs of biological invasion: Mnemiopsis leidyi in the Black sea

@article{Knowler2005ReassessingTC,
  title={Reassessing the costs of biological invasion: Mnemiopsis leidyi in the Black sea},
  author={Duncan Knowler},
  journal={Ecological Economics},
  year={2005},
  volume={52},
  pages={187-199}
}
  • D. Knowler
  • Published 25 January 2005
  • Biology
  • Ecological Economics
Invasions of ecosystems by exotic species have been the focus of a growing body of research in applied biology and ecology, but relatively little attention has been paid to their economic consequences. Even where economic estimates have been made these often make ad hoc assumptions about the biological relationships of interest and lack grounding in economic theory. This paper develops an integrated ecological-economic approach to assess the economic consequences of invasion for a commercially… Expand

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