Reasoning about artifacts at 24 months: The developing teleo-functional stance

@article{Casler2007ReasoningAA,
  title={Reasoning about artifacts at 24 months: The developing teleo-functional stance},
  author={Krista Casler and D. Kelemen},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={2007},
  volume={103},
  pages={120-130}
}
From the age of 2.5, children use social information to rapidly form enduring function-based artifact categories. The present study asked whether even younger children likewise constrain their use of objects according to teleo-functional beliefs that artifacts are "for" particular purposes, or whether they use objects as means to any desired end. Twenty-four-month-old toddlers learned about two novel tools that were physically equivalent but perceptually distinct; one tool was assigned implicit… Expand
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