Reappraisal of the pathogenesis and consequences of hyperuricemia in hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease.

@article{Johnson1999ReappraisalOT,
  title={Reappraisal of the pathogenesis and consequences of hyperuricemia in hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease.},
  author={R. Johnson and S. Kivlighn and Y. G. Kim and S. Suga and A. Fogo},
  journal={American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation},
  year={1999},
  volume={33 2},
  pages={
          225-34
        }
}
  • R. Johnson, S. Kivlighn, +2 authors A. Fogo
  • Published 1999
  • Medicine
  • American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation
An elevated uric acid level is associated with cardiovascular disease. Hyperuricemia is predictive for the development of both hypertension and coronary artery disease; it is increased in patients with hypertension, and, when present in hypertension, an elevated uric acid level is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Serum uric acid level should be measured in patients at risk for coronary artery disease because it carries prognostic information. Hyperuricemia is… Expand
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