Real-life use of inhaled corticosteroids in COPD patients versus the GOLD proposals: a paradigm shift in GOLD 2011?

Abstract

Clinical trials in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients have shown that the long-term use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in COPD patients reduced the number of exacerbations per patient per year and improved health status [1]. Early studies have suggested increased ICS efficacy in patients with low lung function and frequent exacerbations [2]. The efficacy was reinforced when ICS was used in conjunction with long-acting b2-agonists (LABA) [3]. In most countries, health authorities approved ICS/LABA combinations in COPD patients with severe airflow impairment and frequent exacerbations, as also recommended in the Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2007 document [4]. However, several surveys found poor adherence to this proposal among primary care physicians and pulmonologists in ‘‘real life’’, ICS being often prescribed at a milder stage of the disease.

DOI: 10.1183/09031936.00162313

Cite this paper

@article{Burgel2014ReallifeUO, title={Real-life use of inhaled corticosteroids in COPD patients versus the GOLD proposals: a paradigm shift in GOLD 2011?}, author={Pierre-R{\'e}gis Burgel and Ga{\"{e}tan Desl{\'e}e and Gilles J{\'e}brak and Graziella Brinchault and Denis Max Caillaud and Pascal Chanez and Isabelle Court-Fortun{\'e} and R . Uribe - Escamilla and Pascale Nesme-Meyer and Jean-Louis Paillasseur and Thierry P{\'e}rez and Nicolas Charles Roche}, journal={The European respiratory journal}, year={2014}, volume={43 4}, pages={1201-3} }