Real Estate and Artistic Identity in Turn‐of‐the‐Century New York

@article{Davis2006RealEA,
  title={Real Estate and Artistic Identity in Turn‐of‐the‐Century New York},
  author={John F. Davis},
  journal={American Art},
  year={2006},
  volume={20},
  pages={56 - 75}
}
In 1865 the National Academy of Design occupied its new polychrome, Ruskinian‐gothic building on Twenty‐third Street and Fourth Avenue in New York, designed by Peter B. Wight and affectionately known as the Doge’s Palace. Poet William Cullen Bryant gave the opening address, announcing, “After forty years of wandering, the academy has at length a fixed habitation” and noting that the completion of the building reflected the high status in which artists were held in contemporary society. Yet less…