Readout modes and automated operation of the Swift X-ray Telescope

@inproceedings{Hill2004ReadoutMA,
  title={Readout modes and automated operation of the Swift X-ray Telescope},
  author={Joanne E. Hill and David N. Burrows and J A Nousek and Anthony F. Abbey and Richard M. Ambrosi and Heinrich W. Brauninger and Wolfgang Burkert and Sergio Campana and Chaitanya Cheruvu and G Cusumano and Michael J. Freyberg and Gisela D. Hartner and Robert Klar and C. Mangels and Alberto Moretti and Koji Mori and D. Morris and Alexander D. T. Short and Gianpiero Tagliaferri and Darach Watson and P. Wood and Alan A. Wells},
  booktitle={SPIE Optics + Photonics},
  year={2004}
}
The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) is designed to make astrometric, spectroscopic, and photometric observations of X-ray emission from Gamma-ray Bursts and their afterglows in the energy band 0.2-10 keV. In order to provide rapid-response, automated observations of these randomly occurring objects without ground intervention, the XRT must be able to observe objects covering some seven orders of magnitude in flux, extracting the maximum possible science from each one. This requires a variety of… 

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1 2 A ug 2 00 5 THE SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE

The Swift Gamma-Ray Explorer is designed to make prompt multiwavelength observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and GRB afterglows. The X-ray Telescope (XRT) enables Swift to determine GRB positions

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TLDR
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References

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The Swift X-Ray Telescope

TLDR
The X-ray telescope (XRT) enables Swift to determine GRB positions with a few arcseconds accuracy within 100 s of the burst onset, and will measure spectra and lightcurves of the GRB afterglow beginning about a minute after the burst and will follow each burst for days or weeks.

Algorithm for locating PSF-like events and computing the centroid in x-ray images

The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT)[1] is designed to make astrometric, spectroscopic, and photometric observations of X-ray emission from Gamma-ray Bursts and their afterglows in the energy band 0.2-10

Swift X-Ray Telescope

The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer will be launched in 2003 to observe hundreds of gamma-ray bursts per year and study their X-ray and optical afterglows, using a multiwavelength complement of three

SWIFT XRT point spread function measured at the Panter end-to-end tests

The SWIFT X-ray Telescope (XRT) is designed to make astrometric, spectroscopic and photometric observations of the X-ray emission from Gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows, in the energy band 0.2 -

Swift x-ray telescope (XRT)

The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer will be launched late in 2003 to make prompt multiwavelength observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Afterglows. The X-ray Telescope (XRT) provides key capabilities

Centroiding and point response function measurements of the mirror/detector combination for the x-ray telescope on the SWIFT gamma-ray burst explorer

The essential optical components of the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) are already developed items. They are: the flight spare x-ray mirror from the JET-X/Spectrum-X program and a MOS CCD (CCD22) of the

Characteristics of the flight model optics for the JET-X telescope onboard the Spectrum-X-Gamma satellite

The joint European x-ray telescope (JET-X) is one of the core scientific instruments of the RUssian SPECTRUM X-(gamma) astrophysics mission. JET-X is designed to study the emission from x-ray sources

Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift MIDEX mission

The Burst Alert telescope (BAT) is one of 3 instruments on the Swift MIDEX spacecraft to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The BAT instrument is the instrument that first detects the GRB and localizes