Reading the Rookery: The Social Meaning of an Irish Slum in Nineteenth-Century London

@article{Kirkland2012ReadingTR,
  title={Reading the Rookery: The Social Meaning of an Irish Slum in Nineteenth-Century London},
  author={R. Kirkland},
  journal={New Hibernia Review},
  year={2012},
  volume={16},
  pages={16 - 30}
}
Located at the southern area of St. Giles at the northwest end of Drury Lane, the St. Giles “Rookery” was the first and the most notorious Irish district in nineteenth-century London. About eight acres in extent, the Rookery was a perpetually decaying slum seemingly always on the verge of social and economic collapse; in her study of the Irish in Victorian Britain, Lynn Hollen Lees described it as “one of the foulest places in London.” At the heart of this sprawling settlement was a tangled… Expand
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