Reactivating Memories during Sleep by Odors: Odor Specificity and Associated Changes in Sleep Oscillations

@article{Rihm2014ReactivatingMD,
  title={Reactivating Memories during Sleep by Odors: Odor Specificity and Associated Changes in Sleep Oscillations},
  author={Julia S. Rihm and Susanne Diekelmann and Jan Born and Bj{\"o}rn Rasch},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2014},
  volume={26},
  pages={1806-1818}
}
Memories are reactivated during sleep. Re-exposure to olfactory cues during sleep triggers this reactivation and improves later recall performance. Here, we tested if the effects of odor-induced memory reactivations are odor-specific, that is, requiring the same odor during learning and subsequent sleep. We also tested whether odor-induced memory reactivation affects oscillatory EEG activity during sleep, as a putative mechanism underlying memory processing during sleep. Participants learned a… 
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It is proposed that the beneficial effect of reactivation during sleep on memory stability might be critically linked to processes characterizing SWS including, e.g., slow oscillatory activity, sleep spindles, or low cholinergic tone, which are required for a successful redistribution of memories from medial temporal lobe regions to neocortical long-term stores.
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