Reactions of a group of pygmy chimpanzees (Pan paniscus) to their mirror-images: Evidence of self-recognition

@article{Walraven2006ReactionsOA,
  title={Reactions of a group of pygmy chimpanzees (Pan paniscus) to their mirror-images: Evidence of self-recognition},
  author={Vera Walraven and L. V. Elsacker and R. Verheyen},
  journal={Primates},
  year={2006},
  volume={36},
  pages={145-150}
}
A group of seven pygmy chimpanzees (Pan paniscus) was tested for their mirror-image reactions during a ten-day experiment. The time spent viewing the mirror waned quickly. Little social responses directed towards the mirror were observed. Self-directed behaviors were shown from testday one on. It was concluded that four out of seven animals could correctly identify their mirror-image, one infant was not (yet) able to do so, and for two other individuals the results were inconclusive. 
39 Citations

Tables from this paper

There is no other monkey in the mirror for spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi).
  • PDF
Mirror-Induced Behavior in the Magpie (Pica pica): Evidence of Self-Recognition
  • 379
  • PDF
A social cichlid fish failed to pass the mark test
  • 10
The evolution of primate visual self-recognition: evidence of absence in lesser apes
  • 62
  • PDF
A neuroanatomical predictor of mirror self-recognition in chimpanzees
  • 42
  • PDF
Mirror self-recognition: a review and critique of attempts to promote and engineer self-recognition in primates
  • 93
  • PDF
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 21 REFERENCES
Absence of self-recognition in a monkey (Macaca fascicularis) following prolonged exposure to a mirror.
  • G. Gallup
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Developmental psychobiology
  • 1977
  • 68
Development of self-recognition in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).
  • 74
Mirror-image reactions in a tool-using, adult male Macaca tonkeana
  • 29
...
1
2
3
...