Reactions of Chinese Citizens to the Death of Stalin: Internal Communist Party Reports

@article{Li2009ReactionsOC,
  title={Reactions of Chinese Citizens to the Death of Stalin: Internal Communist Party Reports},
  author={Hua-Yu Li},
  journal={Journal of Cold War Studies},
  year={2009},
  volume={11},
  pages={70-88}
}
  • Hua-Yu Li
  • Published 13 May 2009
  • Political Science
  • Journal of Cold War Studies
When the long-time Soviet leader Iosif Stalin died in March 1953, China was in the midst of a social transformation that was generating widespread anxiety and social tensions. Such sentiments were reflected in 30 reports compiled by Xinhua reporters of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) concerning ordinary Chinese citizens' reactions to the death of Stalin. Some Chinese citizens had supported Stalin and, by extension, the CCP and were anxious about the CCP's ability to survive and rule in an… 
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