Re-wilding North America

@article{Donlan2005RewildingNA,
  title={Re-wilding North America},
  author={Josh Donlan},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={436},
  pages={913-914}
}
A plan to restore animals that disappeared 13,000 years ago from Pleistocene North America offers an alternative conservation strategy for the twenty-first century, argue Josh Donlan and colleagues.Home on the rangeCheetahs, lions, elephants, camels and wild horses could be roaming North America again one day. That's the aim of a campaign to turn back the clock by ‘re-wilding’ the continent. Think Pleistocene Park. 
The Pleistocene re-wilding gambit.
  • T. Caro
  • Environmental Science
    Trends in ecology & evolution
  • 2007
Re-wilding: other projects help carnivores stay wild
TLDR
The inherent unpredictability associated with disturbing ecosystems means that, while some introductions might follow the camel’s fate, others might prove all too capable of adapting to contemporary North American environments, potentially at the expense of other species of conservation value.
From Pleistocene to trophic rewilding: A wolf in sheep’s clothing
TLDR
Despite a number of publicized Pleistocene rewilding projects, there has yet to see any quantitative data concerning the impacts of megafauna reintroductions.
BIODIVERSITY LETTER: The North American Pleistocene overkill hypothesis and the re‐wilding debate
TLDR
The conservation agenda to re-wild North America with the extant megafauna most closely related to those that became extinct at the end of the Pleistocene may or may not be realistic in terms of political ecology but it represents a real conservation recommendation.
Re-wilding: don't overlook humans living on the plains
  • S. Shay
  • Environmental Science
    Nature
  • 2005
TLDR
Restoring the native fauna of this region first is a more economically viable and ecologically sound approach, if the goal is to energize positive support for conservation in general.
Re-wilding: no need for exotics as natives return
TLDR
Restoring the native fauna of this region first is a more economically viable and ecologically sound approach, if the goal is to energize positive support for conservation in general.
Pleistocene Rewilding: An Optimistic Agenda for Twenty‐First Century Conservation
TLDR
Pleistocene rewilding would deliberately promote large, long‐lived species over pest and weed assemblages, facilitate the persistence and ecological effectiveness of megafauna on a global scale, and broaden the underlying premise of conservation from managing extinction to encompass restoring ecological and evolutionary processes.
Core Concept: Rewilding
  • J. Carey
  • Environmental Science
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 2016
This region near the Danube delta is a primeval mosaic savannah landscape, a rarity in Europe. Negotiations to reintroduce the once-prevalent red deer, fallow deer, and wolf are underway. The beaver
Conservation Value of Non‐Native Banteng in Northern Australia
TLDR
The success of this endangered non-native species demonstrates that although risky, the deliberate introduction of threatened exotic species into non- native habitat may provide, under some circumstances, a biologically feasible option for conserving large herbivores otherwise imperiled in their native range.
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