Re-theorising mobility and the formation of culture and language among the Corded Ware Culture in Europe

@article{Kristiansen2017RetheorisingMA,
  title={Re-theorising mobility and the formation of culture and language among the Corded Ware Culture in Europe},
  author={Kristian Kristiansen and Morten E. Allentoft and Karin Margarita Frei and Rune Iversen and Niels N{\o}rkj{\ae}r Johannsen and Guus J Kroonen and Łukasz Pospieszny and Trevor D. Price and Simon Rasmussen and Karl-G{\"o}ran Sj{\"o}gren and Martin Sikora and Eske Willerslev},
  journal={Antiquity},
  year={2017},
  volume={91},
  pages={334 - 347}
}
Abstract Recent genetic, isotopic and linguistic research has dramatically changed our understanding of how the Corded Ware Culture in Europe was formed. Here the authors explain it in terms of local adaptations and interactions between migrant Yamnaya people from the Pontic-Caspian steppe and indigenous North European Neolithic cultures. The original herding economy of the Yamnaya migrants gradually gave way to new practices of crop cultivation, which led to the adoption of new words for those… 

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