Re-examining the evidence of the Hercules–Corona Borealis Great Wall

@article{Christian2020ReexaminingTE,
  title={Re-examining the evidence of the Hercules–Corona Borealis Great Wall},
  author={S. Christian},
  journal={Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society},
  year={2020},
  volume={495},
  pages={4291-4296}
}
  • S. Christian
  • Published 2020
  • Physics
  • Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
In the {\Lambda}-CDM paradigm of cosmology, anisotropies larger than 260 Mpc shouldn't exist. However, the existence of the Hercules-Corona Borealis Great Wall (HCB) is purported to challenge this principle by some with an estimated size exceeding 2000 Mpc. Recently, some have challenged the assertion of the existence of the HCB, attributing the anisotropy to sky exposure effects. It has never been explained why the original methods purporting the existence of the HCB produce anisotropies, even… Expand

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