Re-evaluating the role of the mammillary bodies in memory

@article{Vann2010ReevaluatingTR,
  title={Re-evaluating the role of the mammillary bodies in memory},
  author={Seralynne D. Vann},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={2010},
  volume={48},
  pages={2316-2327}
}
  • S. Vann
  • Published 1 July 2010
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Neuropsychologia
Although the mammillary bodies were among the first brain regions to be implicated in amnesia, the functional importance of this structure for memory has been questioned over the intervening years. Recent patient studies have, however, re-established the mammillary bodies, and their projections to the anterior thalamus via the mammillothalamic tract, as being crucial for recollective memory. Complementary animal research has also made substantial advances in recent years by determining the… 
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