Re-evaluating Who Won the Italo-British Naval Conflict, 1940-2

@article{Sadkovich1988ReevaluatingWW,
  title={Re-evaluating Who Won the Italo-British Naval Conflict, 1940-2},
  author={James J. Sadkovich},
  journal={European History Quarterly},
  year={1988},
  volume={18},
  pages={455 - 471}
}
To pose the question of who won the naval war in the Mediterranean may seem somewhat absurd, given the surrender of the Italian fleet to the British at Malta in 1943. And to speak of an Italo-British rather than an Axis-Allied naval conflict seems equally senseless, given that both Italy and Britain were dependent on aid from their allies. Nevertheless, if taken to apply to the relative performances of the Italian and British fleets, the question of who won becomes a legitimate topic of… Expand
1 Citations

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 63 REFERENCES
A Sailor’s Odyssey (London 1951), 240; also Arthur Marder, ’The Royal Navy and the Ethiopian Crisis of 1935-1936
  • American Historical Review
  • 1969
As well as several articles on Italian military history and on Croatia, he is the author of Italian Support for Croatian Separatism
  • 1987
cit , 19 ff. and 31 ff.; and his 'The Sources of Italy's Defeat in 1940: Bluff or Institutionalized Incompetence?', German Nationalism and the European Response
  • 1985
ff.; and his ’The Sources of Italy’s Defeat in 1940: Bluff or Institutionalized Incompetence?’, German Nationalism and the European Response
  • 1985
cit., 96; Lucio Ceva, Storia delle forze armati italiane (Turin
  • British War Production (London
  • 1981
329; also see the articles by Neave-Hill, d'Hoop and Deakin for Franco-British strategy vis-&agrave
  • Actes
  • 1979
Il Cantiere SVAN di Venezie. Ricordi di un cantiere scomparso', in ibid
  • 1979
Le battaglie navali del Mediterraneo nella seconda guerra mondiale
  • 1977
Ricordo del primo radar navale italiano
  • Rivista marittima
  • 1976
...
1
2
3
4
5
...