Re-Evaluating Russia's Biological Weapons Policy, as Reflected in the Criminal Code and Official Admissions: Insubordination Leading to a President's Subordination

@article{Knoph2006ReEvaluatingRB,
  title={Re-Evaluating Russia's Biological Weapons Policy, as Reflected in the Criminal Code and Official Admissions: Insubordination Leading to a President's Subordination},
  author={Jan T. Knoph and Kristina S. Westerdahl},
  journal={Critical Reviews in Microbiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={32},
  pages={1 - 13}
}
  • Jan T. Knoph, Kristina S. Westerdahl
  • Published 2006
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Critical Reviews in Microbiology
  • Half-heartedly acknowledged by the Russian Federation, the Soviet Union ran the world's largest offensive program for biological weapons, breaching the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention. Russia criminalized biological weapons in 1993 only to decriminalize them in 1996, but in 2003 president Putin partly re-criminalized them. None of these changes were declared within the Convention. Several well-known official statements, when reviewed in their context, turned out to admit to neither an… CONTINUE READING
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