Ravens Reconcile after Aggressive Conflicts with Valuable Partners

@article{Fraser2011RavensRA,
  title={Ravens Reconcile after Aggressive Conflicts with Valuable Partners},
  author={Orlaith N. Fraser and Thomas Bugnyar},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2011},
  volume={6}
}
Reconciliation, a post-conflict affiliative interaction between former opponents, is an important mechanism for reducing the costs of aggressive conflict in primates and some other mammals as it may repair the opponents' relationship and reduce post-conflict distress. Opponents who share a valuable relationship are expected to be more likely to reconcile as for such partners the benefits of relationship repair should outweigh the risk of renewed aggression. In birds, however, post-conflict… Expand
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Alternative Behavioral Measures of Postconflict Affiliation
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It is suggested that PC affiliation is best investigated using more than first affiliation latencies, and that the frequency and duration of affiliation may indicate whether affiliation is used to address PC stress. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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