Rats, Communications, and Plague: Toward an Ecological History

@article{McCormick2003RatsCA,
  title={Rats, Communications, and Plague: Toward an Ecological History},
  author={Michael McCormick},
  journal={Journal of Interdisciplinary History},
  year={2003},
  volume={34},
  pages={1-25}
}
  • M. McCormick
  • Published 3 June 2003
  • Biology
  • Journal of Interdisciplinary History
During the last twenty years, archaeozoological research has significantly transformed the picture of the black rat (rattus rattus) in classical antiquity and medieval Europe. These new data, in conjunction with extant texts from these periods, make a great contribution to the understanding of the bubonic plagues of the sixth and the fourteenth centuries, as well as to the history of the communications and economic systems linking the Mediterranean to the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic. The… 
DISPERSAL HISTORY OF AN INVASIVE RODENT IN HUNGARY - SUBFOSSIL FINDS OF RATTUS RATTUS
The origins of the black rat Rattus rattus can be placed in the Indian Peninsula and its occurrence in Europe is a result of a westward expansion. Based on archaeozoological finds, this rodent came
DISPERSAL HISTORY OF AN INVASIVE RODENT IN HUNGARY – SUBFOSSIL FINDS OF RATTUS RATTUS
The origins of the black rat Rattus rattus can be placed in the Indian Peninsula and its occurrence in Europe is a result of a westward expansion. Based on archaeozoological finds, this rodent came
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Palaeogenomic analysis of black rat (Rattus rattus) reveals multiple European introductions associated with human economic history
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Genomic analyses of the ancient rats reveal a population turnover in temperate Europe between the 6th and 10th centuries CE, coincident with an archaeologically attested decline in the black rat population.
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Two independent molecular clock analyses (mcas) reveal that measles (mv) diverged from rinderpest (rpv) c. 1000 c.e. This evidence, when conjoined with written accounts of non-Justinianic plagues in
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