Rationale and design of the oral HEMe iron polypeptide Against Treatment with Oral Controlled Release Iron Tablets trial for the correction of anaemia in peritoneal dialysis patients (HEMATOCRIT trial)

@article{Barraclough2009RationaleAD,
  title={Rationale and design of the oral HEMe iron polypeptide Against Treatment with Oral Controlled Release Iron Tablets trial for the correction of anaemia in peritoneal dialysis patients (HEMATOCRIT trial)},
  author={Katherine A. Barraclough and Euan P Noble and Diana R. Leary and Fiona G. Brown and Carmel M Hawley and Scott B. Campbell and Nicole M. Isbel and David W Mudge and Carolyn L van Eps and Joanna M. Sturtevant and David W. Johnson},
  journal={BMC Nephrology},
  year={2009},
  volume={10},
  pages={20 - 20}
}
BackgroundThe main hypothesis of this study is that oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP; Proferrin® ES) administration will more effectively augment iron stores in erythropoietic stimulatory agent (ESA)-treated peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients than conventional oral iron supplementation (Ferrogradumet®).MethodsInclusion criteria are peritoneal dialysis patients treated with darbepoietin alpha (DPO; Aranesp®, Amgen) for ≥ 1 month. Patients will be randomized 1:1 to receive either slow-release… 
A randomized controlled trial of oral heme iron polypeptide versus oral iron supplementation for the treatment of anaemia in peritoneal dialysis patients: HEMATOCRIT trial.
  • K. Barraclough, F. Brown, David W. Johnson
  • Medicine, Biology
    Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
  • 2012
TLDR
HIP showed no clear safety or efficacy benefit in PD patients compared with conventional oral iron supplements, and the reduction in serum ferritin levels and high costs associated with HIP therapy suggest that this agent is unlikely to have a significant role in iron supplementation inPD patients.
Heme iron polypeptide for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients: a randomized controlled trial
TLDR
HIP is similar in efficacy to IV iron sucrose in maintaining hemoglobin in ND-CKD patients with no differences in adverse events over 6 months, but it is unclear if the greater ferritin values in the IV iron Sucrose group are clinically significant.
Parenteral versus oral iron therapy for adults and children with chronic kidney disease.
TLDR
The included studies provide strong evidence for increased ferritin and transferrin saturation levels, together with a small increase in haemoglobin, in patients with CKD who were treated with IV iron compared with oral iron.
Heme iron polypeptide in treatment of anemia inpregnancy
TLDR
Heme Iron Polypeptide is a better source of iron for iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy, as it has less side effects especially gastrointestinal side effects, because of which it has better compliance.
Parenteral versus oral iron therapy for adults and children with chronic kidney disease.
TLDR
There is insufficient evidence to suggest that IV iron compared with oral iron makes any difference to death (all causes), and the certainty of the evidence was very low.
Heme iron to correct Iron deficiency anemia with pregnancy
TLDR
HIP is safe, tolerable, effective, oral iron preparation to treat iron deficiency anemia with pregnancy; it increases the hemoglobin and replaces the depleted iron store.
Heme iron polypeptide for the management of anaemia of chronic kidney disease
  • R. Dull, E. Davis
  • Medicine
    Journal of clinical pharmacy and therapeutics
  • 2015
TLDR
Oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP) is a newer dosage form that has been reported to have higher bioavailability and fewer side effects when compared with non‐heme iron in healthy subjects, but data in patients with CKD are limited.
Heme-bound iron in treatment of pregnancy-associated iron deficiency anemia
TLDR
Heme-bound iron (Optifer®) is an effective oral iron preparation to treat IDA during pregnancy and to replace the depleted iron store.
Studies on treatment of renal anemia in patients on chronic hemodialysis
TLDR
This thesis is based on the following papers, which will be referred to in the text by their Roman numerals: Hemodiafiltration improves plasma 25-hepcidin levels, and the consumption of erythropoiesis stimulating agents can be reduced by a new administration regimen.
Management of Renal Anemia in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease
TLDR
The mechanism of action of hepcidin, a new iron-regulating molecule produced by the liver, provides a better understanding of why dialysis patients do not absorb oral iron well, and there is great interest in exploring how new ESAs, and particularly the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors, impact hePCidin levels.
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 30 REFERENCES
An evaluation of the effectiveness of oral iron therapy in hemodialysis patients receiving recombinant human erythropoietin.
TLDR
Oral iron fails to maintain iron stores in iron replete patients; iron deficiency observed in this study may be due to poor medication compliance rather than side-effects.
A prospective crossover trial comparing intermittent intravenous and continuous oral iron supplements in peritoneal dialysis patients.
TLDR
Two-monthly i.v. iron infusions represent a practical alternative to oral iron and can be safely administered to PD patients in an outpatient setting and exceeded the cost of oral iron treatment by 6.5-fold.
Clinical evaluation of heme iron polypeptide: sustaining a response to rHuEPO in hemodialysis patients.
  • A. Nissenson, J. Berns, P. Seligman
  • Medicine, Biology
    American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation
  • 2003
Strategies for iron supplementation: oral versus intravenous.
TLDR
Although concerns have been raised regarding iron overload and long-term toxicity with i.v. iron therapy in terms of increased risk of infections, cardiovascular disease, and malignancy, there is little evidence to substantiate this in patients receiving epoetin.
Clinical studies of hip: An oral heme-iron product
Management of iron deficiency in renal anemia: guidelines for the optimal therapeutic approach in erythropoietin-treated patients.
Much progress has been made in recent years in the management of anemia associated with chronic and renal failure with recombinant human erythropoietin (r-Hu EPO). However, there remains much debate
Intravenous ferric saccharate as an iron supplement in dialysis patients.
TLDR
IV Fe as ferric saccharate is a new and safe form of parenteral iron therapy of the anemia of chronic dialysis patients and may allow the target Hct of about 33% to be reached without, or with only very low doses of EPO.
Effects of erythropoietin therapy on iron absorption in chronic renal failure.
TLDR
It is concluded that iron absorption with or without erythropoietin stimulation is unimpaired in patients with chronic renal failure and after adjusting for changes in iron stores with serum ferritin after erythrooietIn therapy, the enhanced ERYthropoiesis associated with erythroid treatment increased absorption about 2-fold, similar to the response observed previously in normal subjects.
Side-effects of oral iron therapy. A double-blind study of different iron compounds in tablet form.
TLDR
Ferrous sulphate, ferrous gluconate,Ferrous fumarate, and ferrous glycine sulphate had almost the same incidence and type of side-effects, but the incidence was significantly higher than when placebo tablets were given.
...
1
2
3
...