Rates of Evolution: Effects of Time and Temporal Scaling

@article{Gingerich1983RatesOE,
  title={Rates of Evolution: Effects of Time and Temporal Scaling},
  author={Philip D. Gingerich},
  journal={Science},
  year={1983},
  volume={222},
  pages={159 - 161}
}
  • P. Gingerich
  • Published 14 October 1983
  • Environmental Science
  • Science
Rates of morphological evolution documented in laboratory selection experiments, historical colonization events, and the fossil record are inversely related to the interval of time over which they are measured. This inverse relationship is an artifact of comparing a narrow range of morphological variation over a wide range of time intervals, and it is also a product of time averaging. Rates measured over different intervals of time must be scaled against interval length before they can be… 

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...

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