• Corpus ID: 161311187

Rashīd al-Dīn: Agent and mediator of cultural exchanges in Ilkhanid Iran

@inproceedings{Akasoy2013RashdAA,
  title={Rashīd al-Dīn: Agent and mediator of cultural exchanges in Ilkhanid Iran},
  author={Anna Ayşe Akasoy and Charles Burnett and Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim},
  year={2013}
}
Rashīd al-Dīn (1274–1318), physician and powerful minister at the court of the Ilkhans, was a key figure in the cosmopolitan milieu in Iran under Mongol rule. He set up an area in the vicinity of the court where philosophers, doctors, astronomers and historians from different parts of Eurasia lived together, exchanged ideas and produced books. He was himself involved in collecting, collating and editing these materials, and the substantial oeuvre that resulted is a gold-mine for anyone studying… 
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