Rare ozone hole opens over Arctic — and it’s big

@article{Witze2020RareOH,
  title={Rare ozone hole opens over Arctic — and it’s big},
  author={Alexandra Witze},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2020},
  volume={580},
  pages={18-19}
}
  • A. Witze
  • Published 27 March 2020
  • Environmental Science, Physics
  • Nature
Cold temperatures and a strong polar vortex allowed chemicals to gnaw away at the protective ozone layer in the north. Cold temperatures and a strong polar vortex allowed chemicals to gnaw away at the protective ozone layer in the north. 
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References

Unprecedented Arctic ozone loss in 2011
TLDR
It is demonstrated that chemical ozone destruction over the Arctic in early 2011 was—for the first time in the observational record—comparable to that in the Antarctic ozone hole.