Raptorial jaws in the throat help moray eels swallow large prey

@article{Mehta2007RaptorialJI,
  title={Raptorial jaws in the throat help moray eels swallow large prey},
  author={R. S. Mehta and P. Wainwright},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2007},
  volume={449},
  pages={79-82}
}
  • R. S. Mehta, P. Wainwright
  • Published 2007
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Nature
  • Most bony fishes rely on suction mechanisms to capture and transport prey. Once captured, prey are carried by water movement inside the oral cavity to a second set of jaws in the throat, the pharyngeal jaws, which manipulate the prey and assist in swallowing. Moray eels display much less effective suction-feeding abilities. Given this reduction in a feeding mechanism that is widespread and highly conserved in aquatic vertebrates, it is not known how moray eels swallow large fish and cephalopods… CONTINUE READING
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