Rapid modification in the olfactory signal of ants following a change in reproductive status

@article{CuvillierHot2004RapidMI,
  title={Rapid modification in the olfactory signal of ants following a change in reproductive status},
  author={Virginie Cuvillier-Hot and Val{\'e}rie Renault and Christian Peeters},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2004},
  volume={92},
  pages={73-77}
}
In insect societies, the presence and condition of egg-layers can be assessed with pheromones. Exocrine secretions are expected to vary in time in order to give up-to-date information on an individual’s reproductive physiology. In the queenless monogynous ant Streblognathus peetersi, we allowed a previously infertile high-ranking worker to accede to the alpha rank, thus triggering the onset of her oogenesis (15 replicates). We then studied her interactions with an established egg-layer from the… Expand
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