Rapid increases in load of human immunodeficiency virus correlate with early disease progression and loss of CD4 cells in vertically infected infants.

Abstract

The relationship between viral burden, timing of transmission, and clinical progression was investigated in 110 children at risk for vertical human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, coculture, and immune complex-dissociated p24 antigen assay. In a cross-sectional study, the mean HIV DNA copy number in 19 symptomatic children was significantly higher than in 31 infected, asymptomatic children (420 +/- 125 vs. 87 +/- 78; P < .0001). In a second group of 8 vertically infected infants followed prospectively from birth, 4 defined as infected in utero showed a more rapid increase in virus load, an accelerated loss of CD4 cells, and early progression to symptomatic disease (3-12 weeks) compared with 4 children with late in utero or intrapartum transmission (10-31 months). These data suggest that a direct relationship exists between HIV replication, the timing of transmission and onset and progression of HIV disease in vertically infected children.

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@article{Dickover1994RapidII, title={Rapid increases in load of human immunodeficiency virus correlate with early disease progression and loss of CD4 cells in vertically infected infants.}, author={Ruth Dickover and Meredith Dillon and Sophie Gillette and A. Deveikis and Margaret A. Keller and Susan Plaeger-Marshall and I Chen and A. Diagne and E. Richard Stiehm and Yvonne J. Bryson}, journal={The Journal of infectious diseases}, year={1994}, volume={170 5}, pages={1279-84} }