Rapid increase in cuckoo egg matching in a recently parasitized reed warbler population

@article{Avils2006RapidII,
  title={Rapid increase in cuckoo egg matching in a recently parasitized reed warbler population},
  author={Jes{\'u}s Miguel Avil{\'e}s and B{\aa}rd G Stokke and Arne Moksnes and Eivin R{\O}skaft and Margrete {\AA}smul and A. P. M{\O}ller},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2006},
  volume={19}
}
Parasitic cuckoos lay eggs that mimic those of their hosts, and such close phenotypic matching may arise from coevolutionary interactions between parasite and host. However, cuckoos may also explicitly choose hosts in a way that increases degree of matching between eggs of cuckoos and parasites, with female preference for specific host phenotypes increasing the degree of matching. We tested for temporal change in degree of matching between eggs of the parasitic European cuckoo (Cuculus canorus… 
Are Cuckoos Maximizing Egg Mimicry by Selecting Host Individuals with Better Matching Egg Phenotypes?
TLDR
It is argued that the existence of an ability to select host nests to maximize mimicry by brood parasites appears unlikely, but this possibility should be further explored in cuckoo-host systems where the host has evolved discrete egg phenotypes.
Brood parasites lay eggs matching the appearance of host clutches
TLDR
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Do cuckoos choose nests of great reed warblers on the basis of host egg appearance?
TLDR
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Egg-spot matching in common cuckoo parasitism of the oriental reed warbler: effects of host nest availability and egg rejection
TLDR
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Continuous Variation Rather than Specialization in the Egg Phenotypes of Cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) Parasitizing Two Sympatric Reed Warbler Species
TLDR
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Conflict between egg recognition and egg rejection decisions in common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) hosts
Common cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) are obligate brood parasites, laying eggs into nests of small songbirds. The cuckoo hatchling evicts all eggs and young from a nest, eliminating hosts’ breeding
The common cuckoo Cuculus canorus is not locally adapted to its reed warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus host
TLDR
This study explored the possibility of local adaptation in cuckoo egg mimicry over a geographical mosaic of selection exerted by one of its main European hosts, the reed warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus, and investigated whether cuckoos inhabiting reedwarblers with a broad number of alternative suitable hosts at hand were less locally adapted.
Why cuckoos should parasitize parrotbills by laying eggs randomly rather than laying eggs matching the egg appearance of parrotbill hosts?
TLDR
No evidence is found for the hypothesis that cuckoos lay eggs based on own egg color matching that of the parrotbill-cuckoo system, and it is argued theoretically that laying eggs matching those of the hosts in this system violates a key trait of the life history of cuckoo and therefore should be maladaptive.
Egg phenotype matching by cuckoos in relation to discrimination by hosts and climatic conditions
TLDR
Differences in host defences still explained differences in mimicry once differences in climatic conditions were controlled, suggesting that selection exerted by host defences must be strong relative to selection imposed by climatic factors on egg phenotypes.
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