Rapid evolution of a geographic cline in size in an introduced fly.

@article{Huey2000RapidEO,
  title={Rapid evolution of a geographic cline in size in an introduced fly.},
  author={Raymond B. Huey and George W. Gilchrist and Monica L. Carlson and David Berrigan and L. Serra},
  journal={Science},
  year={2000},
  volume={287 5451},
  pages={
          308-9
        }
}
The introduction and rapid spread of Drosophila subobscura in the New World two decades ago provide an opportunity to determine the predictability and rate of evolution of a geographic cline. In ancestral Old World populations, wing length increases clinally with latitude. In North American populations, no wing length cline was detected one decade after the introduction. After two decades, however, a cline has evolved and largely converged on the ancestral cline. The rate of morphological… 
Rapid evolution of wing size clines in Drosophila subobscura
TLDR
It is shown that clinal variation in wing size, spanning more than 15 degrees of latitude, has evolved in less than two decades and allochronically estimated evolutionary rates within a single population are over 0.02 haldanes (2800 darwins).
A TIME SERIES OF EVOLUTION IN ACTION: A LATITUDINAL CLINE IN WING SIZE IN SOUTH AMERICAN DROSOPHILA SUBOBSCURA
TLDR
South American females have now evolved a significant latitudinal size cline that is similar in slope to that of Old World and of North American flies, and rates of evolution for females are among the highest ever measured for quantitative traits.
EVOLUTIONARY PACE OF CHROMOSOMAL POLYMORPHISM IN COLONIZING POPULATIONS OF DROSOPHILA SUBOBSCURA: AN EVOLUTIONARY TIME SERIES
TLDR
New samples of inversion frequencies for the colonizing populations are reported: the time series now spans almost one decade for North America and almost two decades for South America, where the initial consistency of clinal evolutionary trajectories seems not to have been maintained.
Temperature‐Related Genetic Changes in Laboratory Populations of Drosophila subobscura: Evidence against Simple Climatic‐Based Explanations for Latitudinal Clines
Parallel latitudinal clines to the long‐standing ones in the original Palearctic populations have independently evolved at different rates for chromosomal polymorphism and body size in South and
Rapid evolution of a divergent ecogeographic cline in introduced lady beetles
TLDR
It is proposed that high levels of genetic diversity from human mediated admixture combined with altered selection pressures may have contributed to the rapid evolution of this unpredicted ecogeographic cline among introduced populations of the seven-spotted lady beetle.
Swift laboratory thermal evolution of wing shape (but not size) in Drosophila subobscura and its relationship with chromosomal inversion polymorphism
TLDR
Wing shape variables were found to differ in response to male genetic constitution for polymorphic chromosomal inversions, which strongly suggests that changes in gene arrangement frequencies as a response to temperature underlie the correlated changes in wing shape because of gene‐inversion linkage disequilibria.
A phylogeographic, ecological and genomic analysis of the recent range expansion of the wasp spider Argiope bruennichi
TLDR
An analysis of the recent range expansion of the European wasp spider Argiope bruennichi indicates that the spider´s range expansion is associated with admixture of formerly isolated genetic lineages from around 1930 onwards, which indicates that invasive spider populations have simultaneously adapted to colder temperatures by shifting their thermal preference and tolerance.
Introduction history of Drosophila subobscura in the New World: a microsatellite‐based survey using ABC methods
TLDR
The Mediterranean region of Europe is proposed as the source of the New World flies, based on mean individual assignment statistics, which yielded the strongest support for the scenario involving a serial introduction with founder events from Europe into South America, and then from South America into North America.
A century later: Adaptive plasticity and rapid evolution contribute to geographic variation in invasive mosquitofish.
TLDR
The results highlight the importance of phenotypic plasticity in invasive species during range expansions and demonstrate that strong selective pressures-in this case towards increased body size in colder environments-simultaneously promote rapid evolutionary divergence.
Wing trait–inversion associations in Drosophila subobscura can be generalized within continents, but may change through time
TLDR
It is found that wing size and shape associations can be generalized across populations of the same continent, but may change through time for wing size, and it is not possible to predict clinal variation from intrapopulation associations.
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