Rapid ecological replacement of a native bumble bee by invasive species.

@article{Morales2013RapidER,
  title={Rapid ecological replacement of a native bumble bee by invasive species.},
  author={Carolina L. Morales and Marina P. Arbetman and Sydney Anne Cameron and Marcelo Adri{\'a}n Aizen},
  journal={Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment},
  year={2013},
  volume={11},
  pages={529-534}
}
Despite rising global concerns over the potential impacts of non-native bumble bee (Bombus spp) introductions on native species, large-scale and long-term assessments of the consequences of such introductions are lacking. Bombus ruderatus and Bombus terrestris were sequentially introduced into Chile and later entered Argentina's Patagonian region. A large-scale survey in Patagonia reveals that, in 5 years post-arrival, the highly invasive B terrestris has become the most abundant and widespread… 

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