Rapid Thinning of Pine Island Glacier in the Early Holocene

@article{Johnson2014RapidTO,
  title={Rapid Thinning of Pine Island Glacier in the Early Holocene},
  author={J. Johnson and Michael J. Bentley and J A Smith and Robert C. Finkel and Dylan H. Rood and Karsten Gohl and Greg Balco and Robert D. Larter and Joerg M. Schaefer},
  journal={Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={343},
  pages={1001 - 999}
}
Once in a While Many regions at the edge of the Antarctic Ice Sheet have rapidly increased the rates at which they are sliding into the sea and thinning, raising concerns that global warming might cause the sudden collapse of some sections. Johnson et al. (p. 999, published online 20 February) present data from Pine Island Glacier, which has been thinning and retreating rapidly over the past two decades. The glacier experienced another rapid thinning around 8000 years ago, which occurred about… 
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