Rapid Nuclear Exclusion of Hcm1 in Aging Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leads to Vacuolar Alkalization and Replicative Senescence

@article{Ghavidel2018RapidNE,
  title={Rapid Nuclear Exclusion of Hcm1 in Aging Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leads to Vacuolar Alkalization and Replicative Senescence},
  author={Ata Ghavidel and Kunal Baxi and Martin A. Prusinkiewicz and Cynthia L. Swan and Zachery R. Belak and Christopher H. Eskiw and Carlos E. Carvalho and Troy A. A. Harkness},
  journal={G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics},
  year={2018},
  volume={8},
  pages={1579 - 1592}
}
The yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, like other higher eukaryotes, undergo a finite number of cell divisions before exiting the cell cycle due to the effects of aging. Here, we show that yeast aging begins with the nuclear exclusion of Hcm1 in young cells, resulting in loss of acidic vacuoles. Autophagy is required for healthy aging in yeast, with proteins targeted for turnover by autophagy directed to the vacuole. Consistent with this, vacuolar acidity is necessary for vacuolar function and… 

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