Rapid Glass Sponge Expansion after Climate-Induced Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse

@article{Fillinger2013RapidGS,
  title={Rapid Glass Sponge Expansion after Climate-Induced Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse},
  author={Laura Fillinger and Dorte Janussen and Tomas Lund{\"a}lv and Claudio Richter},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2013},
  volume={23},
  pages={1330-1334}
}
  • Laura Fillinger, Dorte Janussen, +1 author Claudio Richter
  • Published in Current Biology 2013
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Over 30% of the Antarctic continental shelf is permanently covered by floating ice shelves, providing aphotic conditions for a depauperate fauna sustained by laterally advected food. In much of the remaining Antarctic shallows (<300 m depth), seasonal sea-ice melting allows a patchy primary production supporting rich megabenthic communities dominated by glass sponges (Porifera, Hexactinellida). The catastrophic collapse of ice shelves due to rapid regional warming along the Antarctic Peninsula… CONTINUE READING

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